Go Green With Fast Horse Clients

April 6, 2011
PlantBottle

In honor of Earth Month, I thought it was only appropriate to create a list of five ways people can go green using Fast Horse clients.

1. My inspiration for the list is the national rollout of The Coca-Cola Company’s PlantBottle packaging, which is now available nationwide on DASANI and Odwalla brands. The DASANI bottle is made from up to 30 percent plants and Odwalla single serving bottles are made from up to 100 percent plants. And both are 100 percent recyclable. How cool is that? It’s really a simple and easy way to go green – just visit your local retailer and look for the green cap.

2. At Insight Schools, students attend class virtually, which results in a reduction in the amount of carbon emissions used to travel to a traditional brick and mortar school. Students and teachers of online schools often use more e-books and online assignments/project submission tactics which also reduces paper waste.

3. Did you know windows are one of the most important elements in an energy-efficient home? Yep, it’s true. Installing new, energy-efficient windows in your home can save you up to 25 percent on your monthly heating and cooling bills for years to come. So if you’re looking to build or remodel, check out Marvin Windows and Doors. Marvin uses the most advanced technologies to ensure that they use every bit of timber and they also purchase wood from lumber suppliers with the most sound forest management practices. Finally, Marvin ensures that their energy efficient windows are affordable to the typical homeowner and available in virtually any style or configuration.

4. A mouth-watering way to go green is to visit retailers and restaurants like Tilia that source food and products locally whenever possible. This simple act helps reduce carbon emissions, supports local farmers and oftentimes, just plain tastes better.

5. Pepin Heights owner Dennis Courtier takes pride in the land used to cultivate Pepin Heights apples. Rather than working against mother nature, he works with her and takes into account the orchards’ entire ecosystem. He also operates using fewer pesticides, which makes farming more challenging, but it most certainly produces the best apples.